Quick Reference

Time Period:
Prior to 1930

Location:
Unknown

Medium:
Chalk Drawing

Type:
Landscape

Category:
Farms

Size:
22 x 29

Exhibited:
Longmeadow Women's Club, 1930

Purchased:
Unknown

Provenance:
NA

Noteworthy:

It is unclear to us if the spelling of this artworks name is correct. There appears to be a sibling oil painting, yet it is spelled "Grey."

Related Links

Featured Artwork: Gray Heights

Gray Heights

The image above is of the oil painting Grey Heights, which is believed to be similar in composition.

RSW's Diary Comments

None.


Additional Notes

Uncited clipping regarding this painting
Uncited clipping regarding this painting:


".....A hillside farm, in spite of its title a welcoming
place, is given added significance by the proportion
of sky in the composition. Mr. Woodward looks
at his landscape as Edwin Arlington Robinson looks
at people, not only to give their individuality but to
show the human quality."


What sometimes makes our job here at the website difficult is making sense of things for which we have spotty information. This is one of those cases... We just recently learned that there is an oil painting named Grey Heights, with an "E". To the right is a related uncited/undated clipping using gray with an "A" and butchering the spelling of "Hights." The comments made by its writer are very nice but the author makes no reference as to what type of painting he is referring to, an oil or a chalk? So we have no idea... What we do know is that if the spelling of the "gray" is correct, it is the chalk and it is similar in appearance to the oil. If it is about the oil than we do not know what the chalk may look like.


Name in pencil on back of stretcher
In RSW's hand, the name on the back of the oil

It is conceivable that RSW intentionally spelled "grey" differently for both pieces. Both spellings are correct. However, gray is the more popular spelling in the US, while grey is preferred in the UK. There are a number of instances where RSW would spell it one way or the other. We wonder if he used one word to convey a mood, like in Grey New England, and the other as a description of color.